Does Sugar Cause Heart Disease?

Growing up and living with the diet-heart hypothesis through my professional career has been a remarkable experience.

I was lucky. My mentors were great. I went to all the big cardiology conferences. I read the best books and I learned from the great masters.

Does Sugar Cause Heart Disease?

Early on, I was taught the fairly well established relationship between blood cholesterol and coronary heart disease.

The message to our patients was very clear; lowering blood cholesterol is the main target. It can be achieved by reducing fat intake, avoiding dietary cholesterol and replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids and complex carbohydrates.

But I wonder why we didn’t ask more questions. Why didn’t we request more data? Cardiologists are very research-oriented and usually claim scientific proof for everything.

Was our belief in the diet-heart hypothesis so strong that we didn’t need studies to confirm that our dietary advice would be of benefit?

advertisement

The Warning Signs

Of course, there were those who warned that we might be on the wrong trail.

In 1977, Dr. George V. Mann wrote in The New England Journal of Medicine: “A GENERATION of research on the diet-heart question has ended in disarray (1)”. Mann later wrote a book called Coronary Heart Disease: The Dietary Sense and Nonsense – An Evaluation by Scientists. His book understandably evoked mixed emotions (2).

Mann’s book contained the views of members of the Veritas Society, who in November 1991 met to voice their objections to the diet-heart hypothesis, which they believed was “based upon fragile and selected data.” The society called “for a return to scientific and informational honesty.”

Mann wrote in the preface to his book that “the regulatory agencies have been derelict in their duties, allowing fraudulent health claims to continue in food and drug advertising.”

In 2001, journalist Gary Taubes highlighted the soft science behind the dietary fat hypothesis in a famous article published in Science (3).

US journalist Nina Teicholz took these arguments a step further in her book The Big Fat Surprise that was published 2014.

Uffe Ravnskog, a Danish doctor, has fought relentlessly for decades to convince the medical society that we were wrong about dietary fats and their proposed role in heart disease.

Of course, many physicians still believe that a low-fat diet is the best food choice, and the most effective one to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

In fact, vegetarians appear to have low risk of cardiovascular disease. But nobody has proved it’s because they eat less fat and cholesterol. Vegetarians eat less sugar as well. Antioxidant compounds and polyphenols in fruit and vegetables—such as vitamin C, carotenoids, and flavonoids may be beneficial. Fruit and vegetables are good sources of magnesium and potassium, which have been inversely associated with mortality in previous studies.

In 1988 a small paper reported findings from a group of seven patients with food allergy and elevated serum cholesterol levels who were forced to follow a diet in which most of the calories came from beef fat (4). Their diets contained no sucrose, milk, or grains. During the study, their cholesterol and triglyceride levels decreased significantly, and levels of HDL cholesterol increased. 

The investigators wrote:

These findings raise an interesting question: are elevated serum cholesterol levels caused in part not by eating animal fat (an extremely “old food”), but by some factor in grains, sucrose, or milk (“new foods”) that interferes with cholesterol metabolism?

Sadly, our delusive focus on dietary cholesterol and saturated fat dismisses a huge amount of scientific data suggesting that the effects of diet on cardiovascular health are mediated through many biologic pathways other than cholesterol, including oxidative stress, low-grade inflammation, insulin sensitivity, endothelial dysfunction and blood clotting mechanisms.

By claiming the diet-heart hypothesis is the sole key to our understanding of the role of diet in heart disease, medical professionals like myself have kept the lid on proper understanding of the role of the relationship between dietary factors and cardiovascular disease.

In his book, Pure, White and Deadly, published in 1972, UK doctor John Yudkin wrote:

One of my main reasons for taking up research in this field was that I became more and more uneasy about the prevalent simplistic view of how people get coronary disease – the idea that it is just a matter of cholesterol levels in the blood. This idea is now so firmly held by so very many people that they end up believing that anything that increases cholesterol in the blood is likely to cause coronary disease, anything that reduces cholesterol helps to prevent the disease or even cure it, and anything that does not invariably increase the cholesterol in the blood must have nothing whatever to do with the cause of heart disease. – I know I’m biased, but this picture – in my view a rather naive one, has hindered a proper understanding of its prevention.

advertisement

Sugar and Heart Disease

Lately, we’ve seen epidemiological data suggesting that increased intake of sugar-sweetened beverages increases the risk for metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke (5).

Human intervention studies have showed accumulation of fat in the liver, muscle, and the visceral fat depot induced by sugar sweetened beverages. Most of the studies support the fact that fructose is the main driver of these metabolic aberrations presumably by inducing lipid synthesis and fat release from the liver (6).

Sugar and Heart DiseaseA large survey based on NHANES data and published in JAMA 2014 showed a significant relationship between added sugar consumption and risk for mortality from cardiovascular disease (7). The main findings were that individuals who reported more of their total calorie intake as added sugar did have a significantly increased risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.

Interestingly, Ancel Keys, the father of the dietary-heart hypothesis found an association between sucrose consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease but didn’t think it was an issue. As highlighted in Robert H. Lustig’s book Fat Chance, he believed high sucrose consumption was only a surrogate that correlated with high intake of saturated fat.

Key’s wrote:

The fact that the incidence rate of coronary heart disease was significantly correlated with the average percentage of calories from sucrose in the diets is explained by the intercorrelation of sucrose with saturated fat.

A very recent paper published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition by US investigators addresses the link between sugar intake and cardiovascular risk factors (8). The study tested the effects of consuming beverages sweetened with different doses of high fructose corn syrup on blood lipids and uric acid in 187 adult participants.

The study found that blood levels of LDL-cholesterolnon-HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B, postprandial triglycerides apoCIII and uric acid increased in a dose-dependent manner within two weeks following consumption of different doses of high-fructose corn syrup.

The authors believe their findings provide a plausible mechanistic link to the increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease associated with increased intake of added sugar.

In Pure White and Deadly, John Yudkin describes findings from several laboratories clearly showing that sugar in the diet increases plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. Sugar consumption was also associated with a rise in insulin levels and increased stickiness of platelets that may increase the risk of blood clotting.

A very interesting finding from Yudkin’s studies was that a quarter or a third of their study subjects showed a special sensitivity to sugar while the remainder did not. These individuals showed more rise in insulin levels and they put on more weight than the others.

Yudkin suggested that it might be useful to screen for individuals who were “sucrose sensitive” because they might by at increased risk of coronary heart disease.

Another mechanism whereby sugar consumption may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease is through its effects on blood pressure.

It is well known that high blood pressure increases the risk for cardiovascular disease. Yudkin describes a study performed by Richard Ahrens from the US, who carried out an experiment with young men who were given diets containing varying amounts of sugar. Their blood pressure rose proportionally to the quantity of sugar in the diet.

Decades later, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials showed that high intake of sugar is associated with elevated blood pressure (9).

In a 2014 review paper in Open Heart BMJ Journals, the authors highlight that recommendations to reduce consumption of processed foods in order to reduce hypertension are highly appropriate and advisable. However, they propose that the benefits of such recommendations might have less to do with sodium and more to do with highly-refined carbohydrates (10).

The Bottom Line

High intake of sugar and refined carbohydrates is associated with increased risk of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, lipid disorders and high blood pressure.

Recent findings showing an association between sugar consumption, fructose in particular, and the risk of cardiovascular disease suggest that we have to broaden our perspective in order to understand the relationship between dietary choices and cardiovascular disease.

For years, our overemphasis on the role of dietary fats and blood cholesterol has blurred our understanding of a multifactorial and much more complicated association between diet and heart disease.

Understandably, the medical community and public health authorities may have a hard time admitting their ingenuousness. Furthermore, considering all the commercial interests involved it may be guileless to think that honesty and belief in the scientific method will prevail.

However, let us remember Winston Churchill’s words

To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often

advertisement

0 0 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

51 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Pete
Pete
5 years ago

Your article is confusing and maybe misleading. You identify sugars as the culprit and then don’t distinguish between the various types- sucrose, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), and fructose in fruit. You say that vegetarians eat more fruit (and vegetables) and less sugar. You don’t explain why the fruit isn’t bad. Your hypothesis that vegetarians eat less sugar (and processed grains for that matter) is without any factual basis. From what I see, vegetarians eat lots of grains, often processed grains with added sugars, and added sugars to healthy vegetable-based products that would be bitter without it. Sugared health drinks… Read more »

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago
Reply to  Pete

Thanks for your comment Pete. Your criticism of my article mainly relates to issues I did not write. I won’t respond tho those because it’s out of my scope. However, for the sake of clarification, I feel I must respond to a couple of issues The studies I refer to and my article in general relates to added sugar. That is mostly sucrose (glucose and fructose) or fructose or high fructose corn syrup. Obviously I’m not talking about fruit unless they are fruit products with added sugar such as fruit juice for example. You wrote “Oops. I think your theory… Read more »

bob_johnston
bob_johnston
5 years ago

Axel wrote – “Obviously I’m not talking about fruit unless they are fruit products with added sugar such as fruit juice for example.” So why does fruit get a free pass? Fructose is fructose, whether it is delivered via HFCS or in a slice of watermelon. Fruit as we know it today didn’t exist until man crossbred it for size and sweetness. I don’t think it wise to assume something is healthy (or at least not unhealthy) just because it’s grown in the dirt. Particularly when we get fruit year round rather than just when it was in season like… Read more »

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago
Reply to  bob_johnston

Bob
The fact that fruit is not dealt with in this particular blog post doesn’t necessarily imply that it gets a free pass.
Maybe a subject of another article?

Mie
Mie
5 years ago

Of course it should get a free pass, unless you’re talking about something like eating dozens of bananas a day.

Derek Markell
Derek Markell
5 years ago
Reply to  bob_johnston

Fruit gets a free pass because the fiber it contains slows the rate at which the fructose gets metabolized. In addition to this the amount of fructose in a serving of fruit is considerably less and would require overeating a very high amount to reach harmful levels.

bob_johnston
bob_johnston
5 years ago
Reply to  Derek Markell

Fiber? Really?

Seems to me that whole wheat has a decent amount of fiber but I know that whole wheat spikes blood sugar just as high and just as long as white flour and is just as detrimental. Regardless of how long that fructose rush from a piece of fruit takes to get to the liver it still has to be metabolized by the liver.

And what do you mean by “considerably less”? Are you saying there’s a safe level of consumption for a toxin like fructose? I think I’d like to see a citation for this.

Mie
Mie
5 years ago
Reply to  bob_johnston

There’s no data to indicate that consumption of fruits is harmful but plenty of data to indicate that it’s beneficial. Furthermore, if you argue that fructose is a toxin regardless of intake and carrier food, the burden of proof rests on your shoulders.

bob_johnston
bob_johnston
5 years ago
Reply to  Mie

Plenty of data showing it’s beneficial? Really? I notice you didn’t provide any. And compared to what? Sounds like a lot of observational data where it’s compared to a much worse diet. Am I close? Are you really saying that your liver can differentiate between fructose that was ingested as sugar or fructose that was ingested as fruit? Fructose is fructose, the chemical composition is the same and the source matters not at all. The only thing that matters is the individual’s ability to metabolize it without ill effects. If you have Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease or a host of… Read more »

Mie
Mie
5 years ago
Reply to  bob_johnston

“I notice you didn’t provide any.” No, I didn’t. Surely that means it doesn’t exist, right? 🙂 “And compared to what? Sounds like a lot of observational data where it’s compared to a much worse diet. Am I close?” Well, d’uh. In case you didn’t know, everything in diet & studies of their effect has a point of comparison against which it is judged. E.g. fat and lipid levels: their effect is pitted against that of carbs. Or diets: the point of comparison is the current diet (Western) of the participants. Was this somehow news to you? If so, what’s… Read more »

bob_johnston
bob_johnston
5 years ago
Reply to  Mie

So basically you agree with everything I said except that you’re never are curious about why the various pathways that exist in our bodies are there. That’s some deep thinking.

No essential saturated fatty acid – if that’s your logic the perhaps you can explain why there’s no essential carbohydrates.

Mie
Mie
5 years ago
Reply to  bob_johnston

So … basically you didn’t understand anything I said.

Nor do you understand humor, based on your final sentence.

Nice going Bob.

Derek Markell
Derek Markell
5 years ago
Reply to  bob_johnston

The difference between bread and fruit is that the carbohydrate in bread is glucose, which is known to spike insulin by a considerable amount, where as fruit contains mostly fructose which has no insulin response.

What I mean by “considerably less” is that in moderation the the benefits that come along with fruits may, in certain cases, outweigh the harmful effects of the fructose. Apologies for the poor choice of words I used.

me
me
5 years ago
Reply to  bob_johnston

Fruit gets a free pass because the fructose is mitigated by high fiber.

joe
joe
5 years ago

Doc, is high LDL (300) always bad? Does it make a difference if it is from a high fat diet or if it is from some other disorder? (see my previous post on LDL tripling on a high fat diet.) IN the studies that show high LDL is associated with heart disease, what are the numbers? IE does everyone with high LDL get heart disease? Out of 100 people with LDL of 300, do all of them die early or do some live long? I am not interested in ‘increased risk by x%; I don’t know what that means? If… Read more »

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago
Reply to  joe

Thanks for the comment Joe.
These issues have been discussed in several comment forums on my blog. You will probably find most of it here https://www.docsopinion.com/health-and-nutrition/lipids/ldl-p/

joe
joe
5 years ago

I took a look – said that ApoB / ApoA1 ratio is more important that just ApoB. But did not say what the ratio should be.

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago
Reply to  joe

Joe
The preferable ApoB/ApoA ratio is <0.6 for women and <0.7 for men.

High fat/ketogenic diet appears to raise LDL cholesterol quite much in some individuals. Nobody really know what this means in terms of risk.
Here's a good discussion on the subject https://www.lowcarbdietitian.com/blog/lipid-changes-on-a-very-low-carb-ketogenic-diet-my-own-experience

joe
joe
5 years ago

ouch – on a low carb/high fat diet with my high cholesterol high (385) and LDL was high (283) my apoB was 184 (bad) and my apoA1 was 199 (good) – my ratio was .92, bad. After a month on a low fat, high complex carb diet my cholesterol dropped (196) and my apoB dropped 122 (lower but still high) my apoA1 got worse (126) so the ratio got worse (.96) Also my inflammation went through the roof. crp from 32 to 12. I never had a cholesterol or inflammation problem before – this is very recent. I am starting… Read more »

joe
joe
5 years ago
Reply to  joe

Typo, that was 2 crp on high fat to 12 on high carb.

Mie
Mie
5 years ago

It’s either damaging or not-so-damaging, depending on the context (overall AR). Considering that it (often) takes place in the context of weight loss is a pretty good sign that the diet sucks.

Of course you can be on a HFLC diet and not get increase in LDL. You just have to eat better food.

Christopher Palmer
Christopher Palmer
5 years ago
Reply to  Pete

Pete, It is good that you are thinking and it is also good that you challenge Axel upon certain points. Sugar is neither ‘good’ nor ‘bad’ per se. It is natures way that certain safeguards tend to accompany sugar found in natural foods. it is very mucg the modern way that those certain natural safeguards have been eroded by compromise that assocaites with modern methods and process. I would guard against assuming that all fruits are high in fructose or that fructose is the only sugar to be found in fruits, and I would guard against thinking fructose is ‘better’… Read more »

Judit
Judit
5 years ago

I am confused about Milk being a new food??? (the land of milk and honey??)

David_Brown
David_Brown
5 years ago

“A very interesting finding from Yudkin’s studies was that a quarter or a third of their study subjects showed a special sensitivity to sugar while the remainder did not. These individuals showed more rise in insulin levels and they put on more weight than the others.” One of the favorite ploys of apologists for the sugar industry is to note that normal weight individuals, on average, consume more sugar than fat people. From that they conclude that sugar is not “uniquely fattening.” Says Bill Shrapnel, “The latest WHO report is notable for what it doesn’t say about sugar. It doesn’t… Read more »

Christopher Palmer
Christopher Palmer
5 years ago

Axel, An excellent post, an excellent analysis, and an excellent choice of quote upon which to end. However, have you come around to reading into the biological effects of the several cholesterol oxides. As contributing editors Peng and Morin contributed an excellent book upon the subject (1991) which would still stand as an introduction to the subject matter, and a springboard from which to seek out more contemporaneous mention in literature. There are 49 identified and naturally arising alternate cholesterol oxides. These seem to have some involvement in signalling and status management. Ergo they work like simple hormones. That the… Read more »

RichardCurtin
RichardCurtin
3 years ago

Thank You Christopher Plummer. I learned much from your article. Your take on this subject is much appreciated! You opened some wonderful doors in my mind.

Max
Max
5 years ago

Thanks for this great summary!
I’ve experienced the great success of a grain- and sugar-drained diet by myself: I’m having fam. hypercholesterolemia (Fredriockson IIa) and learned by a set of diet changes that a severe sugar- and grain-reduction accompagnied with a high rise of fat intake resulted in a better LDL-reduction than doubeling the atorvastatin dosage!
Now let’s see how C-RP will do…next Check is in June – after cutting the atorvastatin dosage from 40 to 20 as reaction to you latest post regarding the risk of diabetes….

So, thanks for your input, it helps me a lot!

Max

tannngl
tannngl
5 years ago

“Understandably, the medical community and public health authorities may have a hard time admitting their ingenuousness. Furthermore, considering all the commercial interests involved it may be guileless to think that honesty and belief in the scientific method will prevail.” This is the reason I fear for the health of western nations. Too much to lose in changing dietary advice. I’ve read we’ll be allowed to eat cholesterol now, well, most of us. My guess is that there will be an insidious release of ‘new’ information over prolonged periods of time and eventually the general populace will be told about the… Read more »

Ashkar Lessirey
Ashkar Lessirey
5 years ago

Iam not saying this based on any scientific study.. But purely out of my observation. Here in India we have a fair bunch of vegetarians, who are culturally born and raised in such traditions due to cultural and/or religious reasons. Talking specifically about South india where I come from, we have a great deal of heart patients out here. And vegetarians in here use sugar and dairy very liberally in their diet. Tea and coffee with sugar multiple times a day is norm.. Not to mention our love affair with sweet snacks. I can understand things might be different in… Read more »

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago

Thanks Ashkar.

Very interesting. Are there any theories regarding the high incidence of diabetes among the South Indians?

What’s the prevalence of obesity?

What about rice consumption? A meta-anaysis from 2012 showed an association between whithe rice consumption and type-2 diabetes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22422870

Ashkar Lessirey
Ashkar Lessirey
5 years ago

Theories in here mostly revolve around sugar.. I do not usually see doctors advicing patients regarding rice consumption much.. (My parents are doctors, Iam not) But some do advice to reduce rice consumption aftrer one turns diabetic though ! Its mostly just insulin injuctions and some advices regarding sugar and fruits for most of the part. But havent heard anyone talk about limiting rice consumption as part of a measure to limit chances of turning diabetic. Not even as one of the probable cause. Its not even a talking point. Rice, legumes and vegetables are part of staple diet. Legumes… Read more »

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago

Ashkar
Very informative and interesting.
Appreciate your input.

Ashkar Lessirey
Ashkar Lessirey
5 years ago

You are welcome.. Looking forward for more informative posts..

Solomon Asare
Solomon Asare
5 years ago

Ashker, I have also read your observations elsewhere. Railway doctors observed greater heart disease and diabetes in the vegetarian areas. They thought animal fat was protective. In the west though, it’s taken for granted that that is not the case. A lot of what is passed on to us as nutritional science is anything but.

joe
joe
5 years ago

None of this seems to square with me and from what I read, some paleo folks whose LDL skyrocketed on paleo. I went on a three-year, very high fat, very low carb diet, before which my LDL was 105 on a balanced diet of about 1/3 each of F, P and C. My LDL went to 305. I switched to a very low fat diet of mostly starchy carbs from rice and sweet potatoes, and fruit, and protein for a month and my LDL went to 120. I have a complete Boston Heart breakdown of particle size etc for both… Read more »

Mie
Mie
5 years ago

Axel, when you write things like “By claiming the diet-heart hypothesis is the sole key to our understanding of the role of diet in heart disease, medical professionals like myself have kept the lid on proper understanding of the role of the relationship between dietary factors and cardiovascular disease.” shouldn’t you be ashamed of constructing a straw man? When was the last time anyone suggested that restricting sugar intake WASN’T beneficial? And “delusive focus” on saturated fat? Err, since when did it stop increasing LDL levels and impairing HDL functionality? Or are you still having problems understanding the results of… Read more »

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago
Reply to  Mie

I’m glad yo agree about added sugar. However, I don’t think you’ll find any textbook of cardiology discussing the role of added sugar in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. But you will certainly find a lot on dietary fats and how we should eat or not eat them depending on how they affect our lipid levels. Look at the European Guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice (version 2012) https://eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/05/02/eurheartj.ehs092 There’s your traditional discussion on SFA’s vs PUFA’S and recommendations about limiting saturated fat. However, the guidelines state that “after >40 years of research, the impact of saturated fatty… Read more »

Mie
Mie
5 years ago

“However, I don’t think you’ll find any textbook of cardiology discussing the role of added sugar in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.” Perhaps that’s because it’s rather a matter of etiology, just like safa intake? Both have an effect on lipid levels not per se but the key point is WHAT they replace in diet: both unsaturated fats and fiber-rich foods lower cholesterol as compared to sugar & safa. You CAN of course have both added sugar and safa in your diet, provided that the big picture is in order. “But you will certainly find a lot on dietary fats… Read more »

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago
Reply to  Mie

Mie “As you surely know, there isn’t that much convincing evidence that sugar is a major direct risk factor (and not indirect via met.syndrome/DM2) – no RCT’s with hard end points, for instance.” In fact, I think there is a lot of evidence that that added sugar is a major risk factor for metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, DM, hypertension, NAFLD and cardiovascular disease (it doesn’t matter whether it’s direct or indirect). I thought we agreed on that. You said: “what is so damn impossible about understanding that BOTH the intake of safa and sugar had better be minimal?” Considering the… Read more »

Mie
Mie
5 years ago

“In fact, I think there is a lot of evidence that that added sugar is a major risk factor for metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, DM, hypertension, NAFLD and cardiovascular disease (it doesn’t matter whether it’s direct or indirect). I thought we agreed on that.” For most of these, yes. CVD? I wouldn’t call it a major direct risk factor, based on the evidence at hand. Whether it being direct or indirect risk factor matters or not … well, I suppose it really doesn’t. At least not in a larger context. Anyway, consuming a large amount of added sugar is detrimental… Read more »

Mie
Mie
5 years ago
Reply to  Mie

I’ll correct myself and lend (somewhat preliminary) support to sugar being a direct risk factor in atherosclerosis via lipid level changes. I checked an earlier discussion on the role of sugar in CVD (among other things) at Reijo’s blog because I had a vague flashback of something that might be related to the topic at hand.

https://www.pronutritionist.net/sokerin-terveyshaitat-suhteessa-tyydyttyneeseen-rasvaan/

Now, that’s in Finnish so the interesting part is here

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23471231

Both glucose and fructose have detrimental effects, glucose in terms of chylomicron remnants (ApoB-48) and fructose in LDL etc. (ApoB-100).

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago
Reply to  Mie

Ther’s also the very recent AJCN paper I cited in my blog article https://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2015/04/22/ajcn.114.100461.abstract

Mie
Mie
5 years ago

BTW Axel, I’m still waiting for your answer to the questions below:

“Why the false dichotomy then? Why the misleading use of “delusive”, as the shortcomings of e.g. many fat exhange studies/fat reduction studies have been clearly discussed here in this very blog several times over? Why?”

Mie
Mie
5 years ago

Oh, I almost forgot: for some reason, you listed three people (Taubes, Teicholz and Ravnskov) who’ve been perhaps most active in contributing to the onslaught of nonsense and plain BS in the world of “internet experts” (sic). Without mentioning that their contributions haven’t “exactly” stood up to scrutiny.

Care to explain why?

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago
Reply to  Mie

Mie.

I listed Mann and Yudkin as well.

I know you don’t hold Taubes, Teicholz and Ravnskog in high regard and I’m sure some of their contributions “haven’t exactly stood up to scrutiny”.

However, they’ve had the courage to to challenge current concepts regarding the role of diet in heart disease and obesity. I consider that ti be important because I think these concepts deserve to be challenged.

If they’ve managed to get people like you get up on your feed and shout, they’ve certainly achieved something.

Mie
Mie
5 years ago

“However, they’ve had the courage to to challenge current concepts regarding the role of diet in heart disease and obesity. I consider that ti be important because I think these concepts deserve to be challenged.” Ah, the “courage”. Indeed, I suppose you will then applaud e.g. Peter Duisburg for “courage” in HIV denialism, too? Or could it be that challenging current concepts should be done SCIENTIFICALLY? Don’t know about you, but I’d sure as hell prefer that. 🙂 “If they’ve managed to get people like you get up on your feet shouting, they’ve certainly achieved something.” Oh yes, in the… Read more »

Mie
Mie
5 years ago

“Understandably, the medical community and public health authorities may have a hard time admitting their ingenuousness. Furthermore, considering all the commercial interests involved it may be guileless to think that honesty and belief in the scientific method will prevail.” You probably meant “disingenousness” (if not, that first sentence makes very little sense). Too bad that a) dietary advice has always changed to reflect the change in scientific understanding – and continues to do so and b) “commercial interests” haven’t exactly blurred our understanding of the dangers of high intake of sugar as dietary guidelines have advised against it for …… Read more »

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
5 years ago
Reply to  Mie

Mie. “Ingenuousness”, in the context I was using the word refers to naivety. But I guess the word “disingenousness” also fit swell. Appreciate the tip.

Joe Blowers
Joe Blowers
2 years ago

“In 1988 a small paper reported findings from a group of seven patients with food allergy and elevated serum cholesterol levels who were forced to follow a diet in which most of the calories came from beef fat (4). Their diets contained no sucrose, milk, or grains. During the study, their cholesterol and triglyceride levels decreased significantly, and levels of HDL cholesterol increased.”

That study had 7 people. That’s not even remotely worth mentioning. And you presented it in an entirely misleading way. Not very professional of you.

Axel F Sigurdsson
Axel F Sigurdsson
2 years ago
Reply to  Joe Blowers

It might also be considered unprofessional not to mention these results because they illustrate the individual variation in the effects of different macronutrients on blood lipids.

Interestingly recent data from the large Pure study showed that higher carbohydrate intake was associated with a lipid profile characterized by lower HDL-C and ApoA levels, leading to higher Cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol and ApoB/ApoA ratios and higher TGs.

https://www.docsopinion.com/2016/08/01/carbohydrate-fat-and-lipids/

Allan Mir
Allan Mir
2 years ago

Arslan Library is the ultimate source to Download Free Medical Books in PDF. This website has been designed especially for Medical Students & Doctors and it holds a vast range of Medical Books. Visit our website and Download Free Medical Books. https://arslanlibrary.com/category/all-free-medical-books/

51
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x
Tweet
Pin4
Share2K
Share